AMPONTAN

Japan from the inside out

Slogans

Posted by ampontan on Monday, September 17, 2012

FROM a Chinese Weibo to a Japanese Tweet to you: The slogan for the day for the demonstrations in Kunming:

“Without human rights, slavery will increase even if we expand our territory. Without freedom, we’ll be surrounded, even with a powerful military and weapons. Without fairness, we’ll only be exploited, even if our economy grows. Without democracy, the darkness of tyranny will only deepen, even if our nation is strong.”

Sounds as if they have more on their mind than some Japanese islands, doesn’t it?

Meanwhile, the guessing game has started, especially in Japan: Who started it? Here’s the handicapping for the three choices.

1. Xi Jinping, the future president
He’s the type and he has the authority, but he doesn’t have much of a motive.

2. Hu Jintao, the current president
He has the authority and the motive (ingratiating himself with the military), but is he the type?

3. Sympathizers of the disgraced Bo Xilai
They’re the type and they have the motive, but do they have the authority to pull it off?

One of these days, we might even find out.

Finally, Cheng Yonghua, China’s ambassador to Japan, gave a long interview to the Mainichi Shimbun that was published today. Here’s part of what he said:

“In mid-April this year, Tokyo Metro District Gov. Ishihara Shintaro of all people went to the United States and declared that Tokyo would purchase the islets. Everyone knew this was a confrontational act. By soliciting money from the public, he expanded the contradiction to the level of the citizens. He intentionally created a crisis between the people of both countries.

“Rather than restrict this behavior that would create an uproar, the Japanese government took advantage of the circumstances and purchased the islets themselves, greatly harming Sino-Japanese relations.”

Mr. Cheng seems to forget who started the confrontation in 2010, why Mr. Ishihara took that step, and that governments in free market countries are limited in their ability to stop private-sector real estate transactions, but then he has a job to do.

One more quick one: Hit this link to see 11 excellent photos of the Chinese fishing fleet (and patrol boats) headed to the East China Sea. Many will surely head for the Senkakus. The Nikkei Shimbun yesterday estimated the number at about 10,000. It’s essential viewing for more reasons than one.

Hold on, they keep coming: Another current Weibo to Japanese Tweet to you:

“The Chinese infrastructure, Beijing Airport, Pudong Airport, the main railway lines, power plants, and steel mills were all built with Japanese ODA using long-term, low-interest loans. As President Hu Jintao said when he visited Japan, ‘China’s modernization would not have been possible without Japanese ODA'”.

What the restrictions of the medium prevent him from saying is that Japanese ODA was, in part, de facto war reparations. When Sino-Japanese relations were restored 40 years ago this year, the Chinese chose not to ask for reparations in the spirit of letting bygones be bygones and looking to the future.

But that was then.

Gosh, an update already: Here’s a headline from an editorial in the People’s Daily today.

“When will China pull the trigger on economic sanctions of Japan?”

They conclude by asking if Japan is ready to have the 10 lost years of the economy turn into 20.

And another: Here’s a photo of a banner in Kunming, this from yesterday. This slogan reads, according to Japanese sources, “How to take back the Senkakus? Send the city’s Urban Management Bureau and the corrupt bureaucrats!”

Hard to keep up: A Chinese tweet from a microblogging account in the name of the CEO of a Shanghai company charges that the demonstrations which turned violent in Changsha (trashing the Japanese Heiwa-do department store) on the 15th were conducted by a group of junior high and high school students organized by the Zhuzhou Ribao. That’s a daily newspaper in the city of Zhuzhou in Hunan Province, southeast of the provincial capital of Changsha. He asks, “Who is the biggest mafia in this country?” The newspaper denies the charges. The CEO’s name looks like Pu Mengliao

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6 Responses to “Slogans”

  1. I was impressed by the preparations including the whole pig that was being loaded on one boat. All kidding aside, if a few dozen fishing boats show up, the Japanese Coast Guard is going to have its hands full.

  2. yankdownunder said

    if a few dozen fishing boats show up, the Japanese Coast Guard is going to have its hands full.

    The question is what can the JCG do?
    With so many boats the Chinese will certainly make land. They may even be able to construct some buildings. How can the JCG stop them
    if they cannot use force?
    Then China may send real military ships to protect its people.
    Also what if one of the Chinese fishing boats is blown up and the Chinese have video of same. Is such a staged event unthinkable?

    How can the USFJ help the JCG? Will they help Japan?

  3. toadold said

    If the Japanese Navy goes hot, game over. The exact number of targets both sea and air that an Aegis equipped cruiser and it’s missile load can handle is both variable and classified but it is in the low triple digits. An Aegis cruiser has a greater weapons range than the heaviest WW II battle ship. Then there are the radar directed computer controlled guns that the cruisers,destroyers, and most frigates have. Most of which only need one round to sink a fishing boat. With satellite feed, airborne radar, all feeding into a military detection and targeting net in ships manned by well trained and experienced crews the Japanese Navy could boil the China Sea. Also you have to figure the Japanese Air Force into the equation. It would be extremely risky for the Chinese government to to start a war with Japan. The economic costs of damaged harbors, war insurance, lost fishing boats, blocked shipping lanes, possibly mined harbors, loss of trained men, expensive military equipment, but most of all loss of the Mandate of Heaven.
    Of course history provides a lot of evidence for the folly of kings.

  4. Harry said

    China has five different agencies for maritime law enforcement.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maritime_law_enforcement_agencies_in_the_People's_Republic_of_China

    According to Wedge Infinity, they are called the Five Dragons. Their relationship is too complicated for me to understand.
    http://wedge.ismedia.jp/articles/-/1905?page=2

    They are:
    * The Coast Guard (海警)
    * The Maritime Safety Administration (海事)
    * The Marine Surveillance (海監)
    * The Fisheries Law Enforcement Command (漁政)
    * The General Administration of Customs (海関)

    Before PLAN makes a move, I think the Five Dragons go there and step up pressure. FLEC maybe?

    Leon Panetta visited Japan. If the USFJ helps, I suppose it’ll be intelligence sharing and diplomatic support.

    But why are they provoking us? Do they want us to beef up the navy and the coast guard?
    ——-
    H: Thanks for the note. Panetta went to China after Japan.

    But why are they provoking us? Do they want us to beef up the navy and the coast guard?

    To restore their historical hegemony over the region. They’ve been talking about the Cairo Declaration recently as justification for their claim to the Senkakus, but I just read a day or two ago that Chiang Kaishek also wanted Okinawa, but was told no.

    In fact, in their First Island Chain defense strategy, they include all of Japan.

    I can think of no better way to hasten the process of rewriting Japan’s constitution than this.

    You might find the post that I’ll upload next interesting. A couple of more pages left to translate.

    Yoroshiku!

    -A.

  5. Harry said

    Uh-oh. It appears that a building with a Samsung logo became the next target.
    http://news.donga.com/Inter/3/02/20120917/49464689/2

    Who is next? Foxconn?
    ——
    H: Thanks! I used the photo.

    -A.

  6. yankdownunder said

    http://www.sankakucomplex.com/2012/09/17/chinese-mobs-cripple-man-for-driving-japanese-car/

    Chinese Mobs Cripple Man for Driving Japanese Car

    This and other violent acts and words are not being reported here in Australia. There are reports of demonstrations and some mention of violence but the images and videos show none of it. I think they want to promote a positive image of China.
    ———-
    Y: I think so too.

    In the US, there’s also the factor of not getting the voters upset until they can drag Obama over the finish line again.

    A.

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